Teaching

Market Basket

I’m going to be teaching how to make this market basket. Well, if people sign up, I’ll be teaching this class.

Although I think that beginners can weave this basket, it will be challenging to say the least. The weaving is a ’twill’ weave. A ’twill’ weave is any that is not a ‘simple’ over one, under one. This is a 2/2 weave meaning, of course, over two/under two.

The challenges come from, first the brain and secondly, from the eye.  The first row is easy.  Just weave over 2/ under 2 and end the row.  Knowing where to start the second row is the trick.  The weaver goes between the 2 stakes that had been gone over in the row before it.  Makes sense?  I bet not.  The brain kicks in and decides it does not like to go over/under 2.  Don’t ask me why.  It just doesn’t want to.

Now the eye kicks in.  Because the reed is spaced dyed (multi- colored) it is very hard to see the pattern going up to the left.  Such fun!  To make it a little harder I’ve changed the size of the reed at the top.

Once that’s done, rimming is a snap!  Can’t wait for class to start!

Combined Styles Handle

Japanese/Penland Style Basket

Japanese/Penland Style Basket

Handle -Side ViewHandle - Front ViewButterfly Knot - Top ViewButterfly Knot - Side View

I was asked by another blogger to explain how the handle of the basket was made. Foolishly, I only took the one photo and the basket has sold so I cannot show the handle from a better angle.

I took 3 pieces of flat reed and sandwiched them together. It is wrapped with 2 pieces of flat/oval reed in an “x” pattern up the two sides, leaving about 4″ empty at the top. Very simple.

The top Knot is called a “Butterfly” knot or “Japanese” knot. I have given you a top and side view (from another basket) but, please don’t ask me how to make it. Not so simple!

I hope this post helps a little in understanding the handle.

Elbows

Cherokee Elbow BasketCherokee Elbow Basket These double-mouth baskets were probably started by the Choctaw Indians but several other tribes made them also. They originally were made with River Cane but today we use reed (rattan).

It’s an interesting basket because only stakes are used. Normally baskets have stakes and weavers. In this case the stakes are the weavers also. All the stakes are woven off-center. At this point it looks like a woven base with 2 sets of very long ends and 2 sets of short ends sticking out.

One set of long ends are folded over the base and the other long set are woven into them. (I probably should have pictures. Sorry.) It’s not complicated but it is very awkward. You end up with 2 openings or mouths which are rimmed the same way as any woven basket.

A handle of reed is attached and then wrapped. You end up with a very nice basket. It can be used to dry herbs, display dried flowers or as a container for your kitchen utensils.

Mica Rim

Cat Head with Mica RimClose-Up This is the Large Cat Head basket I made in the class with Billie Ruth Sudduth.

I found this Mica cut into discs which fascinated me. Being Mica, they are very fragile but strong enough to handle and tie. I used purple waxed linen to tie them together and to the basket. I have collected rocks and minerals from the ground all of my life and I have some beautiful samples of Mica. I love the way it reflects light looking solid silver or translucent.

The cat head style basket is one of my favorites and I was pleased to find an attachment to do it justice.

Wicker Basket

Wicker Basket

Wicker Basket


This is my newest endeavor. It is a ‘wicker’ basket made with round reed. Other common materials used for wicker are willow and honeysuckle. I got this pattern from a book “Contemporary Wicker Basketry” by Flo Hoppe. She is one of the best American wicker basket artists.

When I first started making baskets, I was very drawn to wicker style baskets. After trying a very simple design from a friend of mine, I found it was not for me. I found it extremely difficult and frustrating and had no patience for it. I never finished it.

Recently, as I was browsing through my books I found I was, once again, drawn to this type of basket. The pattern is called “Double Diagonals” for the intricate border. Taking my time, and keeping my patience I really enjoyed making this wicker basket. I think I will make this basket again, trying some different techniques and colors. Thank you, Flo!

Billie Ruth Sudduth Class

Clam Basket

Clam Basket

Bushel Basket

Bushel Basket

Appalachian Egg Basket

Appalachian Egg Basket

It’s high time I did some posting. I have been very lax. I was very fortunate to be able to take a class with one of North Carolina’s ‘Living Treasures’, Billie Ruth Sudduth. She taught a class at Penland School of Crafts last July and I was able to attend.

She is most notably known for her ‘Cat Head’ baskets, hence my interest. I learned to make them from one of her books. This class was for “Big” baskets and that they were.

The extra large Calabash clam basket is 15″ in diameter. She named it after a tiny shrimping town on the southern coast of NC and the pattern is named for the bivalve clam. The Chevron pattern is a signature of the Chitimachas tribe of Indians from Louisiana.

This basket uses a ’twill’ weave which is any weave other than over one/under one. There are endless variations of twill weaves. This particular weave is over two/under one which creates an extremely strong basket.

The Bushel basket is 19″ high with a 12″ top diameter. It has multiple colors and is a simple over one/under one weave. We hand dyed all of our reed in this class. The handles are hand carved oak. And, no, I did not carve them myself. Good Grief! I guess you could use this as a laundry basket.

The egg basket is 19″ wide and 14″ deep. I have never seen an egg basket this large. The lashing which holds the two hoops together on each side is called an “ear”. There are different kinds of lashing. The most common one is a “God’s Eye” is a four point lashing. The one used here is a three point lashing, most commonly used in Southern Appalachia. It is also known as “donkey ears”.

We also made a large ‘cat head’ basket. I have not finished the rim yet. I am trying something a little different on that and will post it separately soon.

Japanese Leaf Scoop

IMG_0574When I first saw this I thought it was used to scoop fish out of the water.  Of course, I didn’t think about them sliding back out through the hole!

Anyway, this is an implement, technically not a basket but beautiful just the same.  It is actually used to hold and serve hors d’oeuvres and condiments.  Quite ingenious.  Anytime that reed is woven into itself the process becomes confusing for me.  I did this from a pattern purchased from and designed by Flo Hoppe.

Looking at it, I thought it was quite large but it is only 1  foot long and seven inches at it’s widest point.  The lashing is cane as is the top knot which holds all the reed together.

First Checkerboard. Not!

Red, Gray & Natural

Red, Gray & Natural

This basket was the first checkerboard design I did. I got all the stakes in (the vertical strips), natural, gray, natural, gray, etc. When I went to get the gray weavers (the horizontal strips) I stopped in shock because I had no gray left. I mean, really? I didn’t dye enough strips? So, okay no problem, I’ll use red.

When I finished the second row of weavers (the horizontal strips) now I knew I had a problem. I’m still wondering where my brain went that day because I sat there and stared at the thing for 5 minutes. 5 minutes! When my brain came back from hiding I realized I used the weavers for the stakes. 2 colors in a checkerboard Lynn, 2 colors! All stakes one color and all weavers another. So simple.

The basket came out great but it’s sure NOT a checkboard!

Primitive Arts

Tobacco/Centerpiece

Tobacco/Centerpiece


I like the look of old, old baskets especially from the southern Appalachian mountain areas. Although my baskets don’t have an old look they give a hint of flavor of the old South. I guess they are considered to be primitive because they are so simply made and are over 100 years old. I should do some research are them.

The large square is a repro of the tobacco leaf drying basket. You can still find some in flea markets in the southern states. They were usually quite large; mine is only 14″ x 14″. It is the only basket that is stapled together as far as I know. I used 1″ flat reed and stained it a driftwood color. They are great to hang on a wall. Very graphic looking.

The other is simple centerpiece or mantle basket. It has a high handle (not sure why) and again I kept it very plain with as gray stain although a lot were painted. I’ll try that next.

The Third Lid

Lg. Cat Head w/Lid

Lg. Cat Head w/Lid

Cat Head Basket w/Lid

 

IMG_0386I have finally finished the lid for this basket!  It was touch and go there for a while.  After throwing out the 1st lid, and giving up on the 2nd lid I was determined to make a lid and make it right.  Since I was making it without a pattern or anything else to study I found it to be ‘extreeemly’ difficult.

What I ended up with is an enclosed pyramid. With a flat top.  Or an upside down top!  Ha!  And, hey, I really like it.  But I won’t be doing another one anytime soon!

Just trying to explain this thing is difficult.  Like, does saying I put a base on the bottom and ended with a base on the top make any sense?  Let me know because that’s what I did.  After I found the finial for the top online, Ha!, I knew what I wanted the finished product to look like.  And so, this lid will forever be called “The Third  Lid”.  At least in my mind’s eye!

Let me know what you think.